Exploring our Catholic relationship with God

CCTD010 What, Me?! (Part 2)

Posted in Catechumenate by Dane on the December 29th, 2009
 
icon for podpress  What, Me?! The Blessed Virgin Mary (Part 2 - MP3) [31:32m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

:vote:In this second discussion on Mary, we explore her perpetual virginity, the annunciation of her role in the Christ’s incarnation, and her assumption into heaven. As stated in the first, what the Catholic faith believes about Mary is based on what it believes about Christ, and what it teaches about Mary illuminates in turn its faith in Christ. Five key doctrines, rooted explicitly or implicitly in the Bible, that reveal the truth of who Mary is. This discussion continues through these truths.At the Council of Ephesus in 431 CE, the Church proclaimed that Mary is “the Mother of God.” This term has a very specific meaning. It does not mean that Mary gave to Jesus his divine nature. The Son was, is and always will be one God –the Holy Trinity. The Catholic Church does not teach that Mary is divine. She is no goddess but a creature like us.  Her womb is where Jesus received his human nature. When the Son of God became man –the Incarnation, he did so through Mary. She is the mother of Jesus. Jesus is God. Mary is the Mother of God.Mary’s virginity is a sign of her singular devotion and total gift of herself to God. She is virgin not because sex is evil or incompatible with holiness. Sex is good and created by God in the beginning and sanctified by Christ in the sacrament of Matrimony.   The ancient belief in Mary’s perpetual virginity –before, during and after Jesus’ birth– is affirmed at the Lateran Council in 64p CE. As virgin and mother, she is an exemplary realization of the Church’s vowed –married and celibate.Mary is absolutely unique and special because she is the woman out of all of history who was chosen by God the Father to give human flesh and blood to his divine Son. Throughout history, God calls mere human beings to participate in the realization of salvation. The angel Gabriel announces to Mary God’s intention and records her consent, sought by God and freely given by Mary. The angel’s greeting says who Mary is and what God has done for her –the fullness of grace received at her Immaculate Conception.ÂPreserved from sin since the first moment of her conception, Mary does not suffer the consequences of original sin –death. Rather, at the end of her life, God assumed her body and soul into glory.   We believe she lives now in glory raised up by God who first chose her and revealed to her the way of salvation. We give her the title, “Queen of Heaven,” because we believe so fervently that she shares in her son’s resurrection. This event is called the dogma of the “Assumption.”Our discussion concludes having considered Mary’s unique role in salvation and so in the Church. Why we want to copy her faith, obedience and charity seems clear. As does our reverence for her as a means of grace which guides our journey –all the while without diminishment of Christ’s role, who alone is Lord. More on Mary from the the Cathecism

3 Responses to 'CCTD010 What, Me?! (Part 2)'

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  1. Roy Ornelas said,

    on January 5th, 2007 at 3:00 pm

    We must note that there are only 4 officially defined Dogmas.

    1) Theotokos – “God Bearer” or “Mother of God” at the Council of Ephesus 431AD

    2) Perpetual Virgin – “Ante partum, in partum, post partum” – Latern Council 649AD

    3) Immaculate Conception – Papal Bull “Ineffabilis Deus”, issued by Pope Pius IX on December 8, 1854.

    4) Assumption – “Munificentissimus Deus” issued by Pope Pius XII, 1950

    Now there is a dispute as to whether Pope Paul VI made a dogmatic definition when he called Mary “Mother of the Church” in 1964 at the Second Vatican Council, but at this point, there has been no official proclamation from the Vatican on this point.

    Also, is the present movement to call Mary Co-Redemptrix or Mediatrix of All Graces, but these too have not been dogmatically defined.

    As such I would highly caution you to state that you will be discussing the “5 Dogmas” when the truth is that there are only “4 Dogmas” related to Mary.

    Peace and may God Bless your work.

  2. royornelas said,

    on January 6th, 2007 at 10:37 am

    There are only 4 Dogmas of the Faith not 5.

  3. Dane said,

    on January 10th, 2007 at 3:10 pm

    Hi Roy,

    You are correct; we included Mary Mother of the Church as one of the dogmas. I appreciate your research and I hope you will continue to point out any inaccuracies. It is our strong desire to remain accurate to the teachings of the Church.

    Also, sorry for the delay in approving your post. I have been in India on business for the past two weeks.

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